When we turn our hearts to our ancestors, something changes inside of us. We feel part of something greater than ourselves~Russell M. Nelson

Sunday, November 19, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

November 19-November 25



Nov. 22~
    My paternal grandfather, Benjamin Allen Hudson (1918-1976), was born 99 years ago in Clarendon County, South Carolina. He was the only child of John McSwain Hudson (1880-1961) and Louvinia Blanche (Thames) Hudson (1886-1918). 
Benjamin Allen Hudson
About 1920
Clarendon County, South Carolina
©Cheri Hudson Passey


 William Gordon Bonner Stukes (1745-?), my paternal 6th great grandfather, was born 272 years ago in Cambridge, England.

Nov. 23~
 Ellen Caroline (Martin) Early (1850-1926), my paternal great great grandmother, died 90 years ago in Columbia, Richland, South Carolina. She was 76 years old. Ellen is buried in the Bethesda Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Statesville, Iredell, North Carolina.

 The 197th wedding anniversary of my paternal 4th great grandparents, John Milton Dargan (1799-1847) and Emily Elizabeth (Vaughn) Dargan (1897-1865). They were married in 1820 when John was 20 and Emily 23. Their marriage most likely took place in Sumter District, South Carolina.

Nov. 24~
  Frances Virginia (McRady) McManus (1836-1903), my maternal great great grandmother, died 114 years ago in Sumter County, South Carolina at the age of 47. Fannie is buried in the Pisgah Baptist Church Cemetery, Pisgah Crossroads, Sumter, South Carolina.
Fannie McManus
Headstone
Pisgah Baptist Church Cemetery
Pisgah Crossroads, Sumter, South Carolina
©Cheri Hudson Passey


 My paternal 5th Great Grandfather, Philip Roberts (1763-1854) died 163 years ago in Harrison County, Kentucky.

This date also marks the 129th anniversary of the death of my paternal Great Great Grandfather, Ransom Taylor Early (1829-1888).  Ransom was 76 years old when he died in Statesville, Iredell County, North Carolina. He is buried in the Bethesda Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Statesville.

Ransom Taylor Early
Headstone
Bethesda Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Statesville, Irdell, North Carolina
Photo Credit: Joy Steele-findagrave.com Contributor
Used with permission



Who are you remembering this week?
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,





Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




My Happy Dance This Week:  
 Teaching genealogy classes is something I really enjoy doing. This week, finding out some advice to a student about where to possibly locate needed records which resulted in success had me dancing!
There's not much better for a genealogist to locate the information long sought after for an ancestor. 
My week was made as I celebrated with my student. 


What had you dancing this week?                                                                                    
                

                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!

Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 


Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Saturday, November 18, 2017

Win a Free 4-Day Pass to RootsTech 2018!



As a RootsTech 2018 Ambassador, I am pleased to be able to give a way a free 4-day pass (a $279 value) to the biggest genealogy conference in the world! It will be held from February 28-March 3, 2018 in the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.
What does the pass include?



Airfare, Hotel, Meals, Luncheons, Paid Workshops or other expenses are not included.




Entering is easy! Click on the button on the right to follow my blog,
 like my Facebook page Carolina Girl Genealogy, follow me on Twitter , Instagram and Pinterest.
 Each of these will be considered a separate entry! So that means you have 5 chances to win!
 Leave a message on either of these platforms and let me know you have followed and where. Already a follower? Leave a comment telling me where!
The winner will be chosen by a random drawing and will be sent information on registering.
Planning on being there and purchased a pass? No problem! If you are the winner you will be receive a refund.
Contest begins Saturday, November 18 and ends Sunday, November 26 at midnight ET.
The winner will be announced on Monday, November 27.



In case you are still wondering if RootsTech is where you want to be at the end of February, check out the Why Attend page and my blog posts from last year!
Wednesday at RootsTech -Inspiration, Friends and Fun
Thursday at RootsTech-Tradition, Connection and Song
Friday at RootsTech-Laughter, Tears and Smiles
Saturday at RootsTech-Keynotes, Vendors and Genfriends


So what are you waiting for? Enter today!
RootsTech is a genealogy party! You don't want to miss it!

Thanks for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,




Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Wednesday's Children~Three Years, Three Infants, Three Deaths

Olympic Mill Village
Columbia, South Carolina 

University of South Carolina South Caroliniana Library, Works Progress Administration photograph collection: South Carolina places: 193u-194u., digital image , South Carolina Digital Library (http://scmemory.org/) accessed 14 Nov. 2017,  “Olympia Mill Village Street with Houses”, no. wpapl820, citing Federal Writer’s Project (S.C.), [Columbia, S.C.: Olympia Mill], South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina.

In 1926 my maternal great grandparents William Treadford Roberts (1894-1959) and Beulah Mae (Price) Roberts (1897-1980) were living in the Olympic Mill Village in Columbia, Richland, South Carolina.
In April they welcomed their 10th child, Edith Marie into their family. Edith was not to be with the family long. In August she came down with pneumonia and died on the 21st. William and Beulah's four month old baby girl was buried in an unmarked grave in the cemetery provided for it's workers 
at the mill. 

Death Certificate of Edith Marie Roberts
South Carolina Department of Archives and History,South Carolina, Death Records, 1821-1961” database, Ancestry (http://ancestry.com accessed 19 Dec. 2016), entry for Edith Marie Roberts, certificate number 15453 (1926).

Obituary for Edith Marie Roberts
“Funeral Services Held for Roberts Child” The State (South Carolina), 28 April 1926, p. 2, col. 2, digital images, Newsbank (http://www.newsbank.com: accessed 14 Nov. 2017)


Information provided in letters and interviews indicate another daughter, child 11 was born 21 February 1927. Baby Girl Roberts died the same day. A search for a death record or obituary has not been successful. 

Then in March of 1928, Willie was born. The 12th of William and Beulah's children passed away in July. While information written by family members says the little boy's name was William Treadford, Jr. , his death certificate says Willie Theodore Roberts.
Heart wrenching is the cause of death for little Willie. Emaciation. Secondary cause? Improper feeding.  There is no way to know how this happened to poor Willie. Did he have a problem nursing? Was his mother worn out from the past births? Was there a lack of money to supply formula? Was it even available to the mill families? The Dr. reports only seeing Willie the day of his death.

Death Certificate
Willie Roberts

South Carolina Department of Archives and History,South Carolina, Death Records, 1821-1961” database, Ancestry (http://ancestry.com accessed 21 Dec. 2016), entry for Willie Theodore Roberts , certificate number 13317 (1928).

Like his older sister Edith and most likely the unarmed baby girl, Willie was buried in the Olympia cemetery without a marker.

Obituary for Willie Roberts
“Infant's Funeral” The State (South Carolina), 05 July 1928, p. 2, col. 6, digital images, Newsbank (http://www.newsbank.com: accessed 13 Nov. 2017)

Three babies in three years. None living past 4 months old. Tragic. 

Who are the Wednesday's children in your family tree? Tell their stories so they are not forgotten.

Thanks for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, November 12, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

November 12-November 18




Nov. 18~ 
  My paternal 3rd great grandfather, William A. Martin (1813-1887) died in Statesville, Iredell County, North Carolina 130 years ago. He is buried in Bethesda Presbyterian Cemetery in Statesville.




William A. Martin
Headstone
Bethesda Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Statesville, Iredell, North Carolina
photo credit: Joy Steele. Used with permission



Who are you remembering this week?
Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,.






Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




My Happy Dance This Week:  
 Unexpectedly receiving photos of my paternal great grandfather had me in tears! I had been waiting a long time time get them from my father's cousin. Life kept getting in the way, and the photos were promised many years ago but not sent. Until my phone buzzed and several text messages came through with the pictures attached! My great grandfather Jubal Ransom Early outside of what may have been his home and one with his children, my grandmother's sisters. 
Out of the blue, I was doing that happy dance! I will be blogging about him soon! He was a character!

Jubal Ransom Early (1888-1964)


What had you dancing this week?                                                                                    
                

                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 
http://ctt.ec/6acwg


Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Saturday, November 11, 2017

Randy Seaver's Saturday Night Genealogy Fun~Timelines

This week Randy challenges us to Make an Ancestor's Timeline.
Here's mine made with Legacy Family Tree genealogy software for my maternal 5th great grandfather and Revolutionary War soldier, Phillip Roberts (1763-1854).
The options tab gives several choices in the way a timeline can look and what it contains. There is even a choice for using colors for individuals and events. A list of historical timelines can also be added.



Timelines are very useful in genealogy research. They are a visual representation of the events in an ancestor's life. This tool can help to see holes in your research and by adding what was happening historically, clues to record sets are found. From this short timeline of Phillip Roberts, I can see much more needs to be discovered about his life.
Do you use timelines in your genealogy research?


Thanks for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Tombstone Tuesday-Revolutionary War Patriot


William Vaughn, my paternal 5th great grandfather was born in May of 1764 in North Hampton County North Carolina.
He served as a private in the Calvary from Sumter District, S.C. during the Revolutionary War.
 From "The South Carolina Pension Report of Sumter District Residents, 1835", William is recorded as aged 80 with an annual allowance of $83.33. The pension began on 24, January 1834 and he had received a total amount of  $249.99.

A Bounty Land Application was filled out by William Vaughn on 2 April 1955 in Sumter District at the age of 90. 

William Vaughn
1855 Bounty Land Grant Application
Fold3.com
It's not known at this time if the land was granted to William. He did on 23 September, 1857 and is buried in the Dargan Cemetery in Sumter, South Carolina.





William Vaughn Headstone
Dargan Cemetery
Sumter, South Carolina 


Obituary

“Death of a Revolutionary Soldier” Yorkville Enquirer, (South Carolina), 1 Oct. 1857, p. 2, col. 7, digital images, Chronicling America (https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov: accessed 04 May 2015)

A wonderful description of the life of my 5th great grandfather. He was admired as a great patriot:
"It is said that his hatred for the tories was proverbial, and the the mention of them in his presence, even during the last years of this life, wold always draw from him some expression of this feelings toward them."


Do you have Revolutionary War soldiers in your family history?
We'd love to hear about them!
Thanks for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, October 29, 2017

Sunday Celebration~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




My Happy Dance This Week:  
 Whether it's my own research or that for a client, it's always thrilling to move back a generation and discover new ancestors.
I was able to do just that this week for a client. The documents found to lead me to a maiden name and parents to add more leaves to her tree. Love making those discoveries!


What had you dancing this week?                                                                                    
                

                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 

http://ctt.ec/6acwg


Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Saturday, October 28, 2017

Register for My GPS Class with In-Depth Genealogist Academy!


On November 5th my new class for the In-Depth Genealogist Academy will begin!
I am excited to teach The Genealogical Proof Standard: A Guide for Your Genealogy Journey.

The class is online and will last 4 weeks. There will be video tutorials and a written lesson each week.  Homework will be assigned. It will not be graded but supportive feedback will be given. We also have a water cooler area where you may leave any questions and comments on the things we are learning.

What will we be learning?
Here's an outline for the month of classes:

Week 1-Reasonably Exhaustive Research
Gathering the Information
 Week 2-Complete and Accurate Citations
Leaving a Trail to Follow
Week 3-Analysis, Correlation, and Conflicting Evidence
Taking a Good Look
Week 4- The Written Conclusion
Summing it Up

This class is for beginners as well as those who have more research experience.  It will help build good habits and sharpen skills.

Want to know more?
Visit The In-Depth Genealogist Acadamy where you can watch my video explaining more about the class and find the link to register.

We all want to put our best foot forward when researching for others or our own families.  Understanding and following The  Genealogical Proof Standard is a must for every everyone. 

Register today! Can't wait to see you there!

Helping you climb your family tree,



Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Tuesday's Tip~Gettin' By With Help from Our Friends-Alona Tester


This week it's a pleasure to welcome Aussie friend Alona Tester from Gould Genealogy.

Today’s Tuesday Tip is all about social media and genealogy, and how you can get the most out of it.
Genealogy is HUGE on social media, and it can help you in so many ways. While there are a ridiculous number of social sites around the best known ones are Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Flickr and YouTube, so for the purpose of this article, I’ll stick to just them.
FACEBOOK
(http://www.facebook.com)
Guess what, Facebook is more than just posting pics of your food, and status updates, it has become an invaluable tool for those researching their family history. The last few years there has been a MASSIVE increase in the number of genealogy-related groups and pages on there. If you don’t believe me just check out Katherine Willson’s Genealogy of Facebook list which now has over 11,000 links. My own list for Australian links now has over 1000, and Gail Dever’s list it the place to look for links about Canada. There are country-related genealogy groups, as well as state or county related ones – these are a great place to ask questions relating to research in the region. There are town history groups which share stories and old pictures from the past … which perfect for learning more about the time you family was there. And there are topic-specific ones … DNA, adoption, convicts, military history, genealogy software groups and more. There’s also plenty of “Descendants of ….. “ groups, as Facebook has become a way that extended family members can keep in touch and share information about the family history. You can also follow libraries, societies, and other genealogical organizations to keep up with the latest news and record releases from them.
TWITTER
(www.twitter.com)
Twitter tends to be the next most popular social site, but I find people either get it, or they don’t … it’s just not everyone’s cup of tea. Yes, it’s different from Facebook – for a start, you can only type 140 characters long [update: I see that Twitter are just introducing trials of 280 characters]. So you get snippets of information, rather than long spiels. I follow a bunch of genealogy people and organizations on Twitter to get ‘news’ essentially. But how do you know who to follow? Well a good place to start is to have a look at those who use the hashtag #genealogy. If you’ve not used Twitter before, go to www.twitter.com, type #genealogy in the search box, and see what people are writing that is genealogy-related. Once you’ve created an account, you can then follow them – which means you’ll see all the tweets they send. As I said it’s a great way to get genie news in short snippets.
GOOGLE+
(https://plus.google.com)
If you find that you’re busy enough with Facebook and Twitter you may wish to skip Google+, but it does have the advantage of having communities which some certainly like and is a great way to interact with others with the same interests. And there’s also no adverts clogging it up like there is on Facebook these days.
PINTEREST
(https://www.pinterest.com)
I’ll admit I’m not a Pinterest fan – but that is purely because I have enough other social media accounts to deal with. However, I do know many who are totally hooked on it. Think of Pinterest as like a giant wall of pinboards. You can have up to 500 pinboards (I’m pretty sure that’s the maximum, but correct me if I’m wrong), and you can use keywords to find what others have posted, and if you like it you can pin it on one of your pinboards – so you can go back to it later. While I’m not an active Pinterest user, I know that genealogy is a big topic on Pinterest, so why not check it out?
FLICKR
(www.flickr.com)
This is a great one, but one that’s not used enough. Flickr is a photo sharing site and is generally recognized as being a public place that everyone can see, though you can have private albums if you choose. It’s a place that lots of State Libraries and other organizations are putting their collections, so you’ll find LOTS of old photos. You can search by organization or by keyword. Find photos of the occupations your great-grandfather did, or a photo of the street your grandma grew up in. Or a photo of the church multiple generations of your family were baptized in and so on. Perfect to help fill in the social history and make your history more than just names and dates.
YOUTUBE
(www.youtube.com)
 Where do I start with YouTube? Do you have queries on how to use your genealogy software? Check YouTube? What is the best way to organize my genealogy? Check YouTube. What about some short genealogy tips? There are so many; you’ll lose count! I need some help using this website or that website? Check YouTube. You get the point … there are 1000s of videos on YouTube that you learn from. All the big name genealogy sites have YouTube accounts, as do many major libraries and archives. They’re worth following to keep up with what’s new and how to best use their collections. You can simply type genealogy in the search box, and you’ll get an idea of just how big genealogy is on YouTube. There is a phenomenal lot there, but just scroll through, and you’ll find some that sound interesting, and others that don’t – so just pick and choose.

One last tip … don’t try to follow everyone, and join every social site out there. Seriously, if you do, you won’t have a life! But use the sites you feel more comfortable with, and follow people/groups/organizations that look interesting to you. Learn from them, let them inspire you.




Bio: 
Alona Tester is a family historian from Gould Genealogy. Based in South Australia, she has 25+ years experience in the genealogy industry and is a genealogy educator and blogger.
She is the author of Genealogy & History Newsblog as well as her own personal genealogy blog, LoneTester HQ.





Great tips, Alona! 


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,



Sunday, October 22, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar

Oct. 22-Oct. 28



Oct. 22~
  Loretta "Etta" (McManus) Daughrity (1894-1936), my maternal great grandmother was born 123 years ago in Sumter County, South Carolina. Her parents were William A. McManus (1854-1914) and Frances "Fannie" Virginia (McRady) McManus (1856-1903).  


Etta Daughrity
Sumter, South Carolina


Oct. 24~
    This day is the 24th anniversary of the death of my paternal great grandmother, Emma Ruth Baker Early (1901-1993), Ruth died of congestive heart failure in Columbia, Richland, South Carolina. She is buried in the Sumter City Cemetery in Sumter, South Carolina.
Emma Ruth (Baker) Early
Grave Marker
Sumter City Cemetery, Sumter, South Carolina


Oct. 28~
  My paternal great great grandfather, Arthur Wellington Baker (1857-1940), died 77 years ago at the age of 83 in Sumter County, South Carolina. He was buried in the Sumter City Cemetery. 


Arthur Wellington Baker
Grave Marker
Sumter City Cemetery, Sumter, South Carolina

Who are you remembering this week?

Thanks so much for stopping by!

Helping you climb your family tree,


Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




My Happy Dance This Week:  
Yesterday, I was fortunate to be able to attend the Charleston, SC Family History Center Workshop. This event is held every October. Besides presenting three classes, I was able to meet new people and reconnect with old friends. 
Teaching others about genealogy methods is so much fun! I love to see the "aha" moments as they see how to use the concepts in their research.  
Being with a group of people who are interested in learning and sharing is the best! Each is willing to help and support each other in their passion to find their ancestors.
 Highlights of my day:
Teaching

Presenting Evidence-What's Your Type

Friends

Robin Foster

Toni Carrier




                                                                                     
Marilyn  Trevino

                


                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!



Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 

http://ctt.ec/6acwg


Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!


Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, October 15, 2017

Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance!

You know the dance. You know you've done it. The one every researcher does after finding something new. The one where you want to jump up and down and shout to everyone around that you found the document, contacted a cousin who has the family Bible, made a DNA connection or found a whole new branch to your tree. The one that is met with glazed stares and eye rolls.
                                                          Celebration Sunday is a place to share your discoveries. 
This is a weekly series to enable everyone to tell about their Genealogy Happy Dance moment. This can be done by scrolling down and adding your story to the comments section. You may also put a link to a blog post.




My Happy Dance This Week:  
Another cousin connection! Wow! This time I may have information that can knock down a brick wall. I've said it before and I'll say it again. If you don't have your family tree online where others can see it you are missing an important source of information. Sharing your family and their stories online through a blog, a tree or personal website enables other family members to locate you. This may be the cousin who has the family Bible ,letters or photos. They may have the one document you need to progress up your tree! If you haven't begun to share with others online, I encourage you to begin today. Decide the best way for you and get your family out there! If  you do, you will connect with cousins!


                                                                                     
                                                                        Share your discovery!
                                                                                   Let the dancing commence!


Share the fun! Click below to tweet this post! 



Looking forward to reading about your Happy Dance moment!

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Saturday, October 14, 2017

Sibling Saturday~Boys Will Be Boys!

George and Hattie Roberts Family
About 1907
Back Row -L to R:
   Lillie (Roberts) Hooper (1885-1930)
  Thomas Able Roberts (1887-1961)
  Hattie Roberts (1888-1972)
  George Washington Roberts (1890-1971)
Front Row-L to R:
  William Treadford Roberts (1894-1959)-my great grandfather
  Verdy Gil Roberts (1898-1976)
 Hattie (Brazell) Roberts with Lyda Roberts (1906-1981) 
 George Philip Roberts with Andrew Clifton Roberts (1905-1971) 
Walter Crawford Roberts (1896-1983)

Genealogy is so much more than collecting names, dates and places. It's the stories that help our families come to life. A few years ago, I was fortunate to connect with a distant cousin who shared the following story about the sons of  both my maternal great great grandfather George Phillip Roberts(1856-1930) and his brother Thomas Jefferson Roberts (1866-1955).
"George Phillip's sons as well as Thomas Jefferson Robert's sons among others had happily nicknamed themselves the " Twelve Raggedy-Ass Boys" This was more of a club than what we would think of now as a modern street gang: however, the boys did get into trouble...from time to time. Like the time they set fire to a neighbors outhouse ( in those days the boys referred to it as a "crapper"). the neighbor saw them do it and chased them down, but they ran into Thomas Jefferson Robert's store and hid there. When the neighbor came into the store to confront Thomas Jefferson Roberts, the boys acted like little angels and convinced Thomas Jefferson that they did nothing wrong. Thomas then "escorted" the the irate neighbor out of his store. Thomas Jefferson's store was built on a small hill and the back half of it was on stilts. The boys would often meet underneath the store and it was there that my grandfather, Charles Franklin Roberts and his brother Walter Roberts were playing butcher. they had gotten a hold of one of Thomas Jefferson Robert's meat cleavers from the store and were using a stump to cut up branches, toys and whatever else they could find. Then Charles noticed something that looked better to "butcher" when Walter had his hand resting on the stump. With one swift whack, Charles lopped off one of Walter's fingers. How the boys explained that one I'll never know !"
 ~Cody Dailey. Robert's researcher.

Four of the Roberts Brothers
Verdy,Walter,William and George
© Cheri Hudson Passey

What rascals! It's fun to think of the grandfather my mother knew and loved as part of the "Raggedy-Ass"boys. I wish he had lived long enough for me to ask him about their adventures. 

What about the siblings in your tree? Do you have any stories about their exploits? I'd love to hear about them!

Thanks for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,


Sunday, October 8, 2017

This Week On My Family History Calendar


October 8-October 14




Oct. 11~
 My paternal great great grandfather, Ezra Ashby Hudson (1821-1882) was born 196 years ago in Darlington District, South Carolina. He was the son of Jacob Hudson (1788-1870) and Mary (?).


Oct. 13~
  The 105th wedding anniversary of my maternal great grandparents, Manning David Daughrity, Jr. (1889-1931) and Loretta (McManus) Daughrity (1834-1936). David was 23 and Etta 17 when they married in Bishopville, Lee, South Carolina. 

David and Etta Daughrity
Marriage License 
   
 My 5th great grandmother, Mary (Strother) Dargan (1772-1822) died 195 years ago in Sumter District, South Carolina. 

Who's on your calendar this week?

Thanks so much for stopping by!
Helping you climb your family tree,